ASYDE 2020

15th September Amsterdam, The Netherlands - Virtual Event
2nd International Workshop on Automated and verifiable Software sYstem DEvelopment
Co-located with the 18th International Conference on Software Engineering and Formal Methods (SEFM 2020)

Event Starts In:


Recent News

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, following the decision taken by the SEFM 2020 organisers, also ASYDE 2020 will not take place physically but will be replaced by a virtual event. As usual, ASYDE 2020 accepted contributions will be included in the LNCS post-proceedings and all accepted papers will have to be presented at the virtual conference in order to be included in the LNCS volume. How the virtual conference will be organised is still under consideration, e.g., live presentations and/or recorded ones.


Call for Papers

During the last three decades, automation in software development has gone mainstream. Software development teams strive to automate as much of the software development activities as possible. Automation helps, in fact, to reduce development time and cost, as well as to concentrate knowledge by bringing quality into every step of the development process.
Realizing high-quality software systems requires producing software that is efficient, error-free, cost-effective, and that satisfies customer requirements. Thus, one of the most crucial factors impacting software quality concerns not only the automation of the development process but also the ability to verify the outcomes of each process activity and the goodness of the resulting software product as well. Realizing high-quality software systems requires producing software that is efficient, error-free, cost-effective, and that satisfies evolving requirements. Thus, one the most crucial factors impacting software quality concerns not only the automation of the development process but also the ability to verify the outcomes of each process activity and the goodness of the resulting software product as well.
This becomes particularly true these days when we are, and will be, increasingly surrounded by a virtually infinite number of software artifacts - often underspecified - that can be composed to build new applications. This situation radically changes the way software will produced and used:

    - software is increasingly produced according to a certain goal, that can change during the system's execution, and by integrating existing software;
    - the focus of software production is then on the ability to perform automated reasoning to achieve software integration and development that can be kept always correct-by-construction via static and dynamic verification.


ASYDE 2020 provides a forum for researchers and practitioners to propose and discuss on automated software development methods and techniques, compositional verification theories, integration architectures, flexible and dynamic composition, and automated planning mechanisms.


ASYDE 2020 welcomes research papers, (industrial) experience papers and case-studies, tool demonstrations and visionary papers; nevertheless, papers describing novel research contributions and innovative applications are of particular interest.



Publication



Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Specification, architecture, and design of software and verification models
  • Formal methods for automated software development
  • Model-driven software development
  • Correct-by-construction software development
  • Automated synthesis of software integration code
  • Automated software development and integration
  • Automated and verifiable software development
  • Automated planning methods
  • Description and validation of Non-functional properties of software
  • Software quality assurance for automated software development
  • Compositional theories for software development and its (dynamic) verification
  • Dynamic verification and testing
  • Service-oriented and Component-based software development
  • Machine learning techniques
  • Formal specification of (micro)services
  • Formal models for microservices
  • Automatic methods for the development and verification of smart contracts
  • Methods and tools for (semi)-automatically migrating monolithic systems to component-based or microservice-based systems

ASYDE bio

The ASYDE workshop wants to be the pooling of efforts we have been making over the past decade for organizing a number of successful workshops in the area of Software Engineering and Formal Methods.
It is a follow-up workshop bringing together the following previous events OrChor 2014, SCFI 2015, SCART 2015, VeryComp 2016.
The mission of the ASYDE workshop is to consolidate interest of the SEFM community and related forums on the interplay between software engineering and formal aspects of automated and verifiable software system development.
The steering committee will ensure continuity in the establishment and cross-fertilization of the ASYDE discussion forum towards continuous progress in this important research area.

Important Dates


Paper Submission

July 16th, 2020


July 31nd, 2020

Notification

August 10th, 2020


August 24th, 2020


Submission


ASYDE 2020 welcomes research papers (both long and short), experience reports and tool presentations; nevertheless, papers describing novel research contributions and innovative applications are of particular interest. Accepted papers will be included in the Springer LNCS post-proceedings of SEFM.
Contribution can be:

Regular papers (from 10 to 15 pages): in this category fall contributions that propose novel research work, address challenging problems with innovative ideas, or offer practical contributions (e.g., industrial experiences and case-studies) in the application of FM and SE approaches for building software systems via automated development and verification. Regular papers should clearly describe the situation or problem tackled, the relevant state of the art, the position or solution suggested and the potential benefits of the contribution. Authors of papers reporting industrial experiences are strongly encouraged to make their experimental results available for use by reviewers. Similarly, case-study papers should describe significant case-studies and the complete development should be made available for use by reviewers.

Short papers (from 6 to 8 pages): this category includes tool demonstrations, position papers, well-pondered and sufficiently documented visionary papers. Tool demonstration papers should explain enhancements made in comparison to previously published work. Authors of demonstration papers should make their tool available for use by reviewers.



All papers must:

    - be written in English;
    - be at least 10 pages long (regular papers) or 6 pages long (short papers);
    - not exceed 8 pages (short papers) or 15 pages (regular papers) for the submission and pre-proceedings (up to 2 additional pages will be given for the post-proceedings, only to address reviewers’ comments and feedback from the workshop)

Submissions are required to report on original, unpublished work and should not be submitted simultaneously for publication elsewhere (IFIP's Author Code of Conduct).

Each submitted paper will undergo a formal peer review process by at least 3 Program Committee members.

Paper submission is done via EasyChair.

Speakers

T.B.D.

Schedule

T.B.D.
Download Schedule

Program Committee

    Luciano Baresi - Politecnico di Milano, Italy
    Steffen Becker - University of Stuttgart, Germany
    Domenico Bianculli - University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
    Antonio Brogi - Universita' di Pisa, Italy
    Giovanni Denaro - Universita' di Milano - Bicocca, Italy
    Antinisca Di Marco - Università dell'Aquila, Italy
    Amleto Di Salle - Università dell'Aquila, Italy
    Ehsan Khamespanah - University of Tehran, Iran
    Marina Mongiello - Politecnico di Bari, Italy
    Cristina Seceleanu - Mälardalen University, Sweden
    Meng Sun - Peking University, China
    Apostolos Zarras - University of Ioannina, Greece


Organizers and Main Contact

    Marco Autili (main contact)
    Department of Information Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics - University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila (AQ), Italy
    email: marco.autili@univaq.it
    web-page: http://people.disim.univaq.it/marco.autili/
    Federico Ciccozzi
    Division of Computer Science and Software Engineering – Mälardalen University,
    Västerås, Sweden
    email: federico.ciccozzi@mdh.se
    web-page: : www.es.mdh.se/staff/266-Federico_Ciccozzi
    Francesco Gallo
    Department of Information Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics - University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila (AQ), Italy
    email: francesco.gallo@univaq.it
    web-page: http://people.disim.univaq.it/francesco.gallo
    Marjan Sirjani
    Division of Computer Science and Software Engineering – Mälardalen University,
    Västerås, Sweden
    email: marjan.sirjani@mdh.se
    web-page: http://www.es.mdh.se/staff/3242-Marjan_Sirjani

Steering Committee

Farhad Arbab, Centre for Mathematics and Computer Science (The Netherlands)
Marco Autili, University of L’Aquila (Italy)
Federico Ciccozzi, Mälardalen University, (Sweden)
Dimitra Giannakopoulou, NASA (USA)
Pascal Poizat, LIP6 (France)
Massimo Tivoli, University of L’Aquila (Italy)


Web Chair

Francesco Gallo, University of L’Aquila (Italy)


Publicity Chair

Alexander Perucci, University of L’Aquila (Italy)


Venue

How To Get Here

CWI is located at Amsterdam Science Park, one of the largest concentrations in exact sciences in Europe. It is a hub for research, innovation and entrepreneurship and home of world class research institutes, universities and more than 130 companies, from science based start-ups to multinationals. With over 10,000 students, scientists and entrepreneurs, the park offers excellent opportunities for research and businesses. Amsterdam Science Park is a joint development by the University of Amsterdam, the City of Amsterdam and the Dutch Research Council (NWO).

By Car

CWI is located at Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam. The street name 'Science Park' has been in use since 2011 and might not be implemented in all navigation systems. In case your navigation system does not recognize 'Science Park 123', please use the old address ‘Kruislaan 413, 1098 SJ Amsterdam’ instead.

Directions

    Exit the A10 ringroad at S113/Watergraafsmeer
    Follow the Science Park signs; these will direct you to the Kruislaan
    Turn left onto the Carolina MacGillavrylaan after passing through the railroad tunnel
    Take the Science Park entry at your right and enter the gate

By Bus

Bus 40 serves Amsterdam Science Park four times an hour from stations Amsterdam Amstel (train, metro, tram) and Amsterdam Muiderpoort (train, tram). Get off at bus stop 'Science Park' or 'Science Park Aer'. During rush hour bus 240 can be used, too.

By Train

CWI is a five minute walk away from NS station Amsterdam Science Park. This station is served four times an hour from the directions Amsterdam Centraal – Schiphol and Almere – Amersfoort. Walk through the tunnel after leaving the platform for the science park (northeast exit), cross the street (Carolina MacGillavrylaan) at the crosswalk and walk past the brown building of Amsterdam University College. You will be able to see CWI’s main entrance on your left behind the parking lot.